This year I was trying to compile times and weights of my players in an attempt to formulate Hit Scores. Then I got to wondering what would be the average 20 yd dash times be for 10 and 11 year olds, and also what would be considered fast?


*

What are hit scores?

On another note, how fast a kid can run in a straight line doesn't tell me anything about what position he is going to play...jmo


*

"A boy comes to me with a spark of interest and it becomes a flame. I feed the flame and it becomes fire, I feed the fire and it becomes a roaring blaze" - Cus D'Amato, 1908-1985



Hit scores are used as part of player evalution, you utilize their weight and speed to determine impact force. I don't look for just straight line speed numbers, I use a variety of methods during evals. I was curious as to what would be normal and what would be considered fast. All my kids ran the 20 in the same general times except 2, which spawned my curiousity thats all.

You are watching: 20 yard dash times by age



At 10 i would look at 30 yard dash times.

I have limited space as we share a practice field with 4 other age groups.


*

Shuttle runs are better. Anything where they change direction a couple of times. As far as times go, if your roster is set, then it really is only relative to your team.


Shuttle runs are better. Anything where they change direction a couple of times. As far as times go, if your roster is set, then it really is only relative to your team.

I use shuttle runs, and a variety of drills and games as well, this was actually the first year I've included hit scores. I was really just tying to find out what would be considered a normal 20 yd time and fast one. Thanks for the input as I always look for ways to improve my coaching skills.


I have times from last year for our team. The fastest kids ran 3.3-3.5 range, next group 3.7-3.9 were some of our linebackers and fullbacks. Out of 30 kids we had 3 in the top group and ten in the next group. They were 10 last year.


Thanks, I have 18 kids and had one run in the 3.5-3.6 range(10 yr old) and one in the 3.8-3.9 range. I had several in the 4.0 range including a 10 year old

This year I was trying to compile times and weights of my players in an attempt to formulate Hit Scores. Then I got to wondering what would be the average 20 yd dash times be for 10 and 11 year olds, and also what would be considered fast?

This is data on times based on thirteen years (since 2009) and just over 3000 kids. I have additional scores that would put it over 5000 but I have not had time to enter it all. The scores to the left are average times and the score to the right is the best score I have seen in that drill.

I don't use HIT scores...not a fan of it and I think you have to test linear speed (as it helps to determine explosive strength and raw force production) and lateral speed.

I do three tests for linear speed:10 yard - for quickness (I look at this for every player but I key on it for linemen)20 yard - for speed (most linear runs are just under 20 yards (routes/pursuit/edge runs)40 yard - breakaway speed (tells me who has the extra gear)

10 and 20 are what I look at the most when I eval kids. The only time I really look at breakway (40) is for my CB and RB and WR.

20 yard Pro Agility 6 Tire Zig Zag

Both measure lateral speed and quickness. PA is really a measure of lateral speed and 6 Tire Zig Zag is a measure of lateral quickness. I use 10 yard sprint and the 6 Tire Zig Zag to really look at my linemen as they operate in smaller spaces.

20 yard bear crawl is a good measure of body strength, agility/dexterity, and core strength. An athletic kid in good shape can bear crawl like it is a natural thing. Kids with weak cores and lower body strength won't do it well and kids that are not athletic will have a hard time coordinating the movement. Very easy way to test for athletic ability and strength. If I had to do only one test for athletic ability it would be the bear crawl.

20 yard dummy flip (we use 40lb and 70lb dummies but you can use seabags filled with a mix of mulch and sand (dry the mulch out) and you can stiffen the bag with cardboard inside. The dummy fip measures explosive strength but it also allows me to see what kids like contact and are aggressive. I can tell what kids know how to block/hit/tackle by watching this drill.

All of these are timed and then I add the times together and the lowest total times are the best athletes on the team. I do this every year so teams that I have for three and four years it allows me to see who is developing, who is maturing biologically the fastest (hitting puberty), and who needs work and what he needs.

See more: How Many Nickels In Two Dollars ? How Many Coins Come In A Roll

These times are very accurate as the data is polled not only from my teams but teams from all across the country and coaches that personally know.

Jack

http://www.gregorydoublewing.com/ATHELTIC_SPEED_TIMES_FOR_KIDS_Age_5_to_14.docx

This is a link to my Youth Development page (I need to update it as I have a lot more links and info to add just need to find the time).